AE95 Carib Climate Control Swap

Another “Out of the wreck” score was the entire push-button climate control setup. This was only fitted to AE9X Corollas in trim higher than anything received here in Australia, and as a result, is super rare here on our soil.

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When it came to stripping the setup out of the donor car, there was a fair bit to remove. You literally need the following:

-Push-button control panel fascia

-Heater Box

-Fan Blower Box ( The fan resistor is different )

-Heater core box

-Motors that control doors on blower box and heater box

-Wiring Harness

-Drivers Side Lower Dash Plastic with Cabin air temperature sensor

-Engine bay Ambient Air Temperature Sensor ( Located on Passenger side near radiator support )

– Dash board mounted temperature sensor

– Main Air-vent Fascia / stereo surround

– Fan Control Relay boxes

The removal wasn’t too bad, I had my mate Sam on the go with a few cold ones and we just got to work, removing the entire dash, unplugging the whole dash harness and simply putting everything into a box and making sure the whole lot of it was taken off the donor.

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When it came to the wiring side of things, I luckily had a copy of a Japanese Wiring Supplement from Toyota for an AE95 that I translated to then strip and identify the wiring required to run the show in my car.

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From here, the worst of the whole process – Removing everything out of my car, with care. The dash pad, dash support, everything must come out to do this conversion, to be honest if you’ve never removed this much of a car it will be pretty daunting. The worst of it is getting the blower box out without removing the Aircon core ( I still had good pressure and gas ). This is the same when installing the new gear and requires some serious Tetris too.

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With everything stripped out, I used my English AE95 Wiring supplement to identify what I could use in the car and what needed to be added – I don’t lay looms over other looms when I install stuff.

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I repined what I could using the factory power and fan control wires and laid the extra wiring for the motors and sensors. When the Relay Control Box was swapped I noted that they use a piggy back plug from factory. I made this work in my favour and wired the factory pigback to the new plug so that I in effect, used the original connector and plugged it into the piggy back that was then repinned to suit the slightly different climate control relay box.

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One interesting thing was that Toyota cleverly used different wiring colours to signify push button or manual fan controls. I’d suggest that this was done purely for ease of inspection and diagnosis in workshop conditions.

Once I had everything pinned out, I removed the wiring and installed the blower box, heater box and fascia. From here I used a multimeter to perform tests on all wires to ensure everything was happy prior to putting the whole dash back in it to find a faulty I couldn’t easily reach and repair etc.

After some testing times I had it all slotted back together and installed the finer parts of the interior, proceeding to fire it all up and have a beer after it cranked over as it should. I was a touch nervous playing with such large wires but enjoyed it. The part that really got me was the heater box and fan box stuff – It was really time consuming and frustrated me no end being plastic and fragile!

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For such an old setup by today’s standards, it’s still impressive and does look killer in my car. There isn’t alot of wiring stuff left on the wagon, But the hatch *Rubs hands Together* That’s another story!

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More Soon!

 

Cheers

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